How Sleep Happens and How to Treat it?

Sleep apnea affects twenty million Americans routinely. This is a common disorder, and it affects a person’s breathing while they are asleep. It can happen just for a few times or even many more times while the person is sleeping. A person wakes up when sleep apnea happens as their brain wakes up from the deep stage when it finds the oxygen level of the body decreasing, when the person starts breathing again, they again fall asleep. The quality of sleep decreases when this happens too many times, and then other medical problems follow.

So, if you have sleep apnea symptoms, you need to get treated. You can go and meet with doctors of Hunterdon Pulmonary and Sleep to deal with the problem. Many experienced doctors can treat you and cure you up from the disorder.

Symptoms of Sleep Apnea

Obstructive rest apnea is created by total or partial obstruction of the air passages throughout rest. Throughout rest, an individual’s throat muscular tissues loosen up enabling the tongue and/or fatty cells of the throat to drop back right into the air passages and also obstruct air flow.

As soon as a breath is taken the mind go back to rest, and also the procedure starts once more. This procedure can take place simply a couple of times an evening or thousands of times an evening relying on the extent of the problem.

Modest OSA: The victim experiences 15-30 episodes of disruptions in breathing in an hour.

Moderate OSA: The victim experiences 5-14 episodes of disruptions in breathing in an hour.

Extreme OSA: The patient experiences 30 or even more disruptions in breathing in an hour.

Treatment of Sleep Apnea

PAP or Positive airway pressure Therapy

  • BiPAP or Bilevel positive airway pressure
  • APAP or Automatic positive airway pressure
  • CPAP or Continuous positive airway pressure

Oral Appliances

  • Tongue retaining mouthpieces
  • MADs or Mandibular advancement devices

Surgery

  • UPPP or uvulopalatopharyngoplasty Adenotonsillectomy
  • Nasal surgery
  • MMA or Maxillomandibular Advancement